EAC - Europae Archaeologiae Consilium

Publications

EAC11

EAC Occasional Paper 11

now available

When Valletta meets Faro

The reality of European archaeology in the 21st century

Edited by Paulina Florjanowicz
Budapest, 2016

The book can be ordered here, at Archaeolingua

Over the past decades, European archaeology has focused on different ways of researching and protecting sites in areas intended for construction and other forms of land development. This type of archaeology, which has become the predominant model of this scientific discipline, has been given different names all over Europe: for example preventive, rescue, commercial, contract, development-led.

Whichever term we use to describe it – it is worth discussing. Therefore, the European Archaeological Council chose it as the theme for its annual symposium held in Lisbon in March 2015. With this event, the EAC completed a triptych of debates on the true effects of the Valletta Convention on European archaeology started in 2013 (EAC Occasional Paper no. 9) and followed in 2014 (EAC Occasional Paper no. 10).

The idea behind the Lisbon symposium was to integrate the approach of the Valletta Convention, which shaped preventive archaeology policies as we know them, with the concept of heritage communities contained in the Faro Convention, which determines the 21st century holistic and participatory approach to heritage governance.

The symposium comprised three sessions outlined by the EAC Board as a consequence of experience from the two previous conferences. Overall, the volume covers 21 contributions from archaeologists throughout Europe. The scope of issues tackled is quite broad, from pure legal analysis to emotions unleashed with archaeological discoveries related to the tragic history of Europe in the 20th century. Wide geographical representation is provided by authors from a range of countries extending from Portugal to Estonia.

CONTENTS (click to show/hide more informations)





EAC10

EAC Occasional Paper 10

now available

Setting the Agenda

Giving New Meaning to the European Archaeological Heritage

Edited by Peter A.C. Schut, Djurra Scharff and Leonard C. de Wit
Budapest, 2015

The book can be ordered here, at Archaeolingua

More than two decades after the signing of the Valletta Convention the time is ripe to draw up a new agenda for how Europe should manage its archaeological heritage. With this purpose in mind, the EAC organised two symposiums that were attended by heritage managers from 25 European countries. At the first symposium in Saranda, Albania, we looked back at twenty years of ‘Valletta’, identifying its benefits, problems and challenges. The results of these discussions can be found in EAC Occasional Paper No. 9.

The second symposium was held in Amersfoort, the Netherlands, and took the form of a working conference. The results are published in this volume, which largely comprises the Amersfoort Agenda for managing the archaeological heritage in Europe. This agenda ties in with the ideas of the Council of Europe’s Faro Convention on the Value of Cultural Heritage for Society (2005). A link is also made with the ideas of the European Union, as expressed in the Conclusions on Cultural Heritage adopted by the Council of the European Union (2014) and a Communication adopted by the European Commission (2014). The zeitgeist calls for an acknowledgement of the multiple values of archaeological heritage for society and recognises the potential role of archaeological heritage in sustainable development.

The Amersfoort Agenda has three themes: 1. Embedding archaeology in society, 2. Dare to choose, and 3. Managing the sources of European history. The various articles in this book are organised under these themes, which they explore in greater depth. Reports of the break-out sessions have also been included so that readers can follow the discussions that have led to the Amersfoort Agenda.

CONTENTS (click to show/hide more informations)





EAC Occasional Paper 9

 

The Valletta Convention

  Twenty Years After - Benefits, Problems, Challenges

Edited by Victoria M. van der Haas and Peter A.C. Schut
Budapest, 2014

The book can be ordered here, at Archaeolingua

 

The Valletta Convention (1992) was the result of a process which started with the Convention of London (1969) where the foundation for contemporary archaeological preservation was laid. The inclusion of archaeology in the process of spatial planning was one of the most important milestones. In most European countries it meant a strong growth of archaeological research, including the emergence of commercial archaeology, while also in situ conservation received increasing attention. However, the close interaction between archaeology and spatial planning also meant a risk. Over the past few years it has not been easy for archaeological research due to the recession.

The youngest generation of archaeologists can hardly comprehend what archaeology was like before 1992. Now, in 2014, we can say that Valletta has become visible in all parts of archaeology. Not only are new residential quarters, industrial and infrastructural works archaeologically investigated, also within the field of public information and cultural tourism there are important achievements. The implications for education are great. Although the main focus within archaeological training lies in scientific research, there is a visible expansion of training for policy archaeologists.
In this publication the main topics are addressed. Not only the successes, but also the challenges and possible solutions will be addressed. Due to articles written by experts from different parts of Europe, this publication provides the reader with a good view of the state of affairs in various countries.

 

CONTENTS (click to show/hide more informations)





EAC Occasional Paper 8

Who cares? Perspectives on Public Awareness, Participation and Protection in Archaeological Heritage Management

 

Edited by Agneta Lagerlöf Budapest, 2013
Edited by Agneta Lagerlöf

The book can be ordered here, at Archaeolingua

 

 

The increasing numbers of reports on tampering with ancient monuments and archaeological materials may reflect more acts of plunder. But it could also reflect a higher incidence of reporting of such acts to competent authorities or a combination of them both. A third solution is of course that acts of plunder are currently deemed more newsworthy than before in our part of the world. And if this is the case, we must ask why has this become important now, and also, how does this influence our understanding of what is happening? The complexity of this problem and the ethical issues it raises require us to examine our view of the archaeological source material and archaeology as a profession in relation to society at large.
An international conference took place in Paris 2012 with participants from different European countries. The purpose of the conference was to discuss the kind of measures that need to be taken and what the societal consequences of these may be.

 

CONTENTS (click to show/hide more informations)





EAC Occasional Paper 7

Heritage Reinvents Europe

 

Edited by Dirk Callebaut, Jan Mařík and Jana Maříková-Kubková
Budapest, 2013
224 pp., with 152 illustrations

The book can be ordered here, at Archaeolingua

 

 

Unity in Diversity, the motto of the European Union, has, since World War II, seldom been as relevant as it is today. In these difficult economic times Europe is more and more confronted with the phenomenon that citizens openly stand up for the defence of their national and regional interests. This has put enormous pressure on the process of European integration and the concept of a shared European identity based on the cultures of individual EU member states. Thus, understanding the diversity of European cultural heritage and its presentation to the broadest audience represents a challenge that can be answered by diversified group of scientists, including archaeologists, historians, culturologists, museologists etc. By choosing “Heritage reinvents Europe” as the theme for the 12th EAC colloquium that was held between the 17th–19th March 2011, in the Provincial Heritage Centre in Ename, Belgium, the board of the Europae Archaeologiae Consilium made its contribution to the understanding of the key concept of a shared European identity.

 

CONTENTS (click to show/hide more informations)





EAC Occasional Paper 6

Large-scale excavations in Europe: Fieldwork strategies and scientific outcome

Proceedings of the International Conference
Esslingen am Neckar, Germany, 7th – 8th October 2008 

 

Edited by Jorg Bofinger and Dirk Krausse, Budapest, 2012
208 pp., with 185 illustrations

The book can be ordered here, at Archaeolingua

 

 

During the last decades, the number of large-scale excavations has increased significantly. Such excavations became an important element of archaeological cultural heritage management. This kind of large-area fi eldwork off ers not only new data, fi nds and additional archaeological sites, but also gives new insights into the interpretation of archaeological landscapes as a whole. Our view of the results of older excavations and our ideas on settlement structures and land use in the past has changed dramatically. New patterns concerning human “off site activities”, e.g. fi eld systems, or types of sites which were previously underrepresented, can only be detected by large-scale excavations. Linear projects especially, such as pipelines and motorways, off er the possibility to extrapolate and propose models of land use and environment on the regional and macro-regional scale.

 

CONTENTS (click to show/hide more informations)





EAC Occasional Paper 5

 

Remote Sensing for Archaeological Heritage Management

 

David C Cowley, Budapest, 2011
312 pp., with 218 illustrations

The book can be ordered here, at Archaeolingua

 

 

Remote sensing is one of the main foundations of archaeological data, under pinning knowledge and understanding of the historic environment. The volume, arising from a symposium organised by the Europae Archaeologiae Consilium (EAC) and the Aerial Archaeology Research Group (AARG), provides up to date expert statements on the methodologies, achievements and potential of remote sensing with a particular focus on archaeological heritage management. Well-established approaches and techniques are set alongside new technologies and data-sources, with discussion covering relative merits and applicability, and the need for integrated approaches to understanding and managing the landscape. Discussions cover aerial photography, both modern and historic, LiDAR, satellite imagery, multi-and hyper-spectral data, sonar and geophysical survey, addressing both terrestrial and maritime contexts. Case studies drawn from the contrasting landscapes of Europe illustrate best practice and innovative projects.

CONTENTS (click to show/hide more informations)





EAC Occasional Paper 4

 

 

Heritage Management of Farmed and Forested Landscapes in Europe

 

Stephen Trow, Vincent Holyoak and Emmet Byrnes, Budapest 2010
184 Seiten, 111 Farbabbildungen

The book can be ordered here, at Archaeolingua

The book in Pdf format 

Some 40 per cent of Europe is farmed and 47 per cent forested. The future of the majority of Europe’s archaeological sites therefore depends on rural land uses that lie outside the spatial planning and development control systems of its various nation states. This volume, produced by the European Association of Archaeologists (EAA) and Europae Archaeologiae Consilium (EAC) Joint Working Group on Farming, Forestry and Rural Land Management, examines the challenges posed by agriculture, forestry and other rural land uses in terms of the long-term conservation of Europe’s archaeological sites and the management of its historic landscapes. Profusely illustrated and with contributions from no fewer than 13 different European countries, the volume will be essential reading for anyone concerned with contemporary heritage management, policy-making and legislation.

CONTENTS (click to show/hide more informations)






EAC Occasional Paper 3



Listing Archaeological Sites, Protecting the Historical Landscape

Peter A.C. Schut, Brussels 2009
169 Seiten, 123 Farbabbildungen, 5 Tabellen

The book can be ordered here, at Archaeolingua

The book in Pdf format

CONTENTS (click to show/hide more informations)





EAC Occasional Paper 2



Europe's Cultural Landscape:
archaeologists and the management of change


G. Fairclough/S. Rippon, Brussels 2002.
234 Seiten, 100 sw Abbildungen, 26 Farbabbildungen

The book can be ordered here, at Archaeolingua

The book in Pdf format 

CONTENTS (click to show/hide more informations)





EAC Occasional Paper 1



The Heritage Management of Wetlands in Europe

B. Coles/A. Olivier, Brussels 2001.
207 Seiten, 79 s-w Abbildungen, 27 Farbabbildungen

The book can be ordered here, at Archaeolingua

The book in Pdf format

CONTENTS (click to show/hide more informations)





Willem J.H. Willems (ed.)

Challenges for European Archaeology



Report on the Inaugural Meeting of the Europae Archaeologiae Consilium at the Council of Europe in Strasbourg, France, on 25 and 26 November 1999. Zoetermeer 2000.

CONTENTS (click to show/hide more informations)

11,35 Euro




Ordering EAC Occasional Paper: http://www.archaeolingua.hu/ordering.html